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About the Utah State Law Library

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The Utah State Law Library serves the legal information needs of Utah's courts, executive agencies, legislature, attorneys, and the public. While our collection is located in Salt Lake City, library services are available to everyone.

The library is open Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. except federal and state holidays.

Policies


Legal Research and Advice Policy

Court employees are prohibited from giving legal advice. Advising people what the law is and how it applies to their situation is practicing law, which is what lawyers do.

Library staff are able to help you use the library, but we cannot research or interpret the law for you.

See the court's Finding Legal Help page for information about sources of legal help.

Law Library Staff Can:
  • Explain how to use legal resources
  • Help you locate a particular statute or case when you have a specific reference or citation
  • Direct you to sources of law, including statutes and cases
  • Direct you to form books, court rules, and books about the law
  • Recommend sources to start your research
  • Direct you to materials for your school assignment
  • Refer you to agencies
Law Library Staff Cannot:
  • Interpret the meaning of statutes, cases or regulations
  • Choose statutes, cases or regulations for your situation
  • Choose specific forms or language to use in forms
  • Tell you how to file a document, what document to file, or how to proceed with court actions
  • Give opinions on legal matters

Computer Use Policy

The Utah State Law Library provides public computers to access court, government, and legal resources on the Internet.

Failure to comply with our computer use policy will result in the loss of computer privileges.

  • You may use our computers for court, government, or law-related research.
  • You may save files to a flash drive or a CD-R. You can buy a CD-R for 50¢.
  • If others are waiting we will impose a two hour usage time limit.
  • No more than 2 people may share a computer station.
  • You may not use our computers for illegal activity, or to offend, harass, threaten, or intimidate anyone.
  • You may not save anything to the hard drive.
  • You may not access public email websites such as AOL, Gmail, Hotmail, and Yahoo because of the risk of viruses.
  • You may not alter the configuration of or otherwise damage our equipment.

Attention! PLEASE NOTE: The Internet has a wealth of resources, but the law library cannot be responsible for its content. You should critically evaluate the information you find for accuracy, completeness, and currency. You may encounter offensive material.

Checkout Policy

By state law, only specific groups of state government employees may check out materials from the law library. All others are welcome to use materials in the library.


History of the Library


Territorial History

The Utah State Law Library has existed in some form since the Utah Territory was established. In fact, Congress appropriated $5000 for the library in the same enabling act that created the territory.

It took a couple of years for the collection to be purchased, and in 1852 the territorial legislature created the position of territorial librarian, with an annual salary of $400 and $150 for contingent expenses.

In 1890 the legislature broke up the library's collection, directing books "more useful to the University library" be given to the University of Deseret (today's University of Utah). Only the law-related books remained in the collection.

Utah State Library

When Utah became a state in 1896 the Territorial Library became the State Library.

Utah State Law Library

In 1957 the legislature changed the name of the library from the State Library to the State Law Library, and established a new, separate State Library.


Utah State Law Library | 450 S. State Street | 801-238-7990 | Directions | View Map



Page Last Modified: 8/11/2011
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