Collections

The role of the court collections department in the Restorative Justice/Balanced Approach model is to encourage accountability of the offenders to complete their Court-ordered obligations. When court-ordered fines, restitution and hours become past due, the offender is considered to be in contempt of court and the collections department will proceed to collect the court-ordered amounts. Restitution (money owed to the victim re: loss or damage) is always the priority. Collections letters are mailed and the collections staff may work with the juvenile offender to set up a payment plan to avoid further sanctions. If no response is made to the letters or payment arrangements are not kept, collection efforts will proceed. The collections department can suspend the drivers license or serve the offender with notice to appear in court for an Order to Show Cause where other sanctions can be imposed. If the juvenile offender turns 18 and there is a social security number reflected in the records, the State of Utah Income Tax refund will be attached by the Court. The Third District Juvenile Court has implemented payment by credit card to assist in collecting fines and restitution.

Regardless of the age of the person, the Juvenile Court retains jurisdiction to collect past due moneys ordered by the Court when the offender was a juvenile. The person, as an adult, is still obligated to pay.

There are collections clerks in Third District Juvenile Court who assertively suspend driver licenses and serve offenders with Order to Show Cause hearings. Their salaries and benefits are paid from a percentage of funds collected from past-due fines. In 2007, Third District Juvenile Court collected a total of $872, 883 in fines and fees, $615,000 in restitution, and 395,000 community service hours.

If you have any questions regarding past due accounts, please contact:

Collections Supervisor: (801) 233-9622
Matheson and West Jordan accounts: (801) 233-9628 or (801) 233-9614


Page Last Modified: 1/27/2010
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